‘Papua New Guinean Ways’: Hybrid livelihoods and human development (2015)

Policy complexity sometimes masks consistent and enduring concerns. What really are the key developmental priorities for a country with tremendous wealth in natural resources, yet a substantial history of resource mismanagement? Similarly, while any country’s greatest resource is its people, in PNG there have been failures to invest in human development. We know that some countries with few resources (e.g. Japan, Singapore and Cuba) have successfully upgraded their productive capacities, by investing heavily in their people. Continue reading “‘Papua New Guinean Ways’: Hybrid livelihoods and human development (2015)”

Melanesian customary land and hybrid livelihoods (2010)

Community land was at the root of indigenous survival and social relations until colonial regimes enforced dispossession. Yet, as if by an accident of history, the countries of Melanesia (and particularly Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) largely escaped this fate. To this day, the great majority of land in these countries is still held by communities and families under a customary law which is neither written down nor centrally registered. Continue reading “Melanesian customary land and hybrid livelihoods (2010)”