Solidarity aid: The Cuba-Timor Leste health programme (2008)

This paper considers distinct views of ‘capacity building’ in health aid, using the example of the largest health aid programme in the Asia-Pacific region, the Cuba-Timor Leste health cooperation. By 2008 there were 300 Cuban health workers in Timor Leste, while 850 Timorese students were studying medicine with Cuban trainers. The paper contrasts ‘big money’ neoliberal notions of aid with Cuban notions of solidarity amongst peoples and investment in human resources. Continue reading “Solidarity aid: The Cuba-Timor Leste health programme (2008)”

The Doctors of Tomorrow / Los Medicos de Mañana (2008)

In 2003, Timor Leste and Cuba began a health cooperation program. By 2008, this included 300 Cuban health workers and 850 East Timorese students. This film is about those students. Continue reading “The Doctors of Tomorrow / Los Medicos de Mañana (2008)”

Health, income and public institutions: Explaining Cuba and Costa Rica (2007)

The World Bank in 2004 sought to explain socialist Cuba’s success in public health, and juxtaposed Costa Rica as a contender for similar public health gains, through the orthodox model which stresses broad based growth , backed by increased private investment. However a unique public institution (the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social) for health and social security insurance better explains Costa Rica’s health advances, and its superior performance to some higher income Latin American countries such as Mexico and Argentina. Continue reading “Health, income and public institutions: Explaining Cuba and Costa Rica (2007)”

The structuring of health systems and the control of infectious disease: Looking at Mexico and Cuba (2006)

This paper considers the implications that distinct organising principles for health systems have for the control of infectious diseases. The paper takes the health systems in Mexico and Cuba as examples of neighbouring but widely divergent systems, producing different public health outcomes. The paper will look at the dissimilar organising principles of these two systems, along with their programs and outcomes in relation to five of the most important and dangerous infectious diseases. Continue reading “The structuring of health systems and the control of infectious disease: Looking at Mexico and Cuba (2006)”

Social values embedded in health systems: infectious disease in Mexico and Cuba (2006)

This paper discusses the implications, for infectious disease control, of distinct social values embedded in health system organising principles. The Mexican and Cuban health systems are taken as examples of neighbouring but widely divergent systems, producing different public health outcomes. The paper will look at the organising principles of these two systems, along with their programs and outcomes in relation to five of the most important and dangerous infectious diseases Continue reading “Social values embedded in health systems: infectious disease in Mexico and Cuba (2006)”

Contesting “transition”: The U.S. plan for a “free Cuba” (2005)

The contradictions of U.S.-Cuba relations have rarely been more intense. The pattern of siege and resistance continues, the U.S. imperial project of remodelling Cuba faces new constraints, and a “transition” of sorts, conditioned by U.S. engagement but not determined by U.S. policy, is already occurring. This article will examine new contradictions in the U.S. language of “freedom” over Cuba some new developments in its near half-century of economic siege and destabilisation, and the new problems faced by U.S. arguments for a postsocialist “transition” in Cuba. Continue reading “Contesting “transition”: The U.S. plan for a “free Cuba” (2005)”

Independent structural adjustment: Cuban and neoliberal models compared (2003)

This article considers the capacity of small island and independent nation-states to recover from serious external economic crises by looking at the case of Cuba in the 1990s and comparing Cuban adjustment with adjustment in Thailand under an essentially IMF-controlled plan in 1997. Cuba had to restructure its socialist economy in the wake of the collapse of its trading relationship with the old Soviet Union and other Council for Mutual Economic Assistance countries. Continue reading “Independent structural adjustment: Cuban and neoliberal models compared (2003)”

Island Socialism: Cuban Crisis and Structural Adjustment (2002)

This paper summarises the political economy of the Cuban revolution, then analyses the impact of the COMECON collapse, the unique measures of Cuban structural adjustment in the 1990s, and the outcomes and new challenges for the Cuban political economy. It concludes that the Cuban experience identifies a viable alternative means for an independent state to deal with and stabilise severe external economic crisis, and that the reformed Cuban collective institutions have been strong enough and have sustained sufficient public support to withstand this crisis. Continue reading “Island Socialism: Cuban Crisis and Structural Adjustment (2002)”